Saturday, February 3, 2007

Art of Dr. Seuss Fraud COVERUP

Updated: June 16, 2012

NOTE: Though The Chase Group have changed their -FAQ's-, on their http://www.drseussart.com/faq.html website since this monograph was first published, the core issues and many of the quotes have not changed. Excerpts from The Chase Group's [August 1, 2011] FAQ website have been added.


"Oh, the Places You'll Go!, Image Size 13" x 17 1/2", Limited Edition of 2500 Arabic Numbers, 99 Patron's Collection, 155 Collaborator Proofs, 5 Hors d' Commerce, $425 Unframed" As of June 16, 2012, it is listed as: "SOLD OUT INDIVIDUALLY, This artwork is available only through Portfolio V." http://www.drseussart.com/details/illustration/ohtheplaces.html
NON-DISCLOSED CHROMIST-MADE FORGERY

Since 1997, Audrey Geisel, The Chase Group and all participating galleries have been offering for sale, at $225 or more each, the so-called "Art of Dr. Seuss," but in reality selling -at best- non-disclosed chromist-made -forgeries.

On page 660 of the Seventh Edition of Black's Law Dictionary, -forgery- is defined as: "The act of fraudulently making a false document or altering a real one to be used as if geniune."



"[detail: "©1978 Dr. Seuss Enterprises, L.P. All Rights Reserved."] Oh, the Places You'll Go!, Image Size 13" x 17 1/2", Limited Edition of 2500 Arabic Numbers, 99 Patron's Collection, 155 Collaborator Proofs, 5 Hors d' Commerce, $425 Unframed" As of June 16, 2012, it is listed as: "SOLD OUT INDIVIDUALLY, This artwork is available only through Portfolio V."
http://www.drseussart.com/details/illustration/ohtheplaces.html
BOGUS 1978 DATE GIVEN FOR POSTHUMOUS FORGERIES


© 1978 DR. SEUSS ENTERPRISES, L.P.
On the Dr. Seuss Enterprise's http://www.drseussart.com/ biography.html website, it states: "In 1993, Ted’s widow Audrey founded Dr. Seuss Enterprises (DSE) to to protect and monitor the use of Dr. Seuss’s characters for licensing purposes."

The Dr. Seuss Enterprises, L. P.  could -not- have copyrighted anything in 1978.

Non-existing companies don't copyright.

[NOTE: What seems as a fuzzy "1978" date could actually be "1970" which would  mean Dr. Seuss Enterprises L.P. was some 23 years away from existing rather than just 15 years.]




"[detail] "Dr. Seuss"] Oh, the Places You'll Go!, Image Size 13" x 17 1/2", Limited Edition of 2500 Arabic Numbers, 99 Patron's Collection, 155 Collaborator Proofs, 5 Hors d' Commerce, $425 Unframed" As of June 16, 2012, it is listed as: "SOLD OUT INDIVIDUALLY, This artwork is available only through Portfolio V."
http://www.drseussart.com/details/illustration/ohtheplaces.html
COUNTERFEIT DR. SEUSS SIGNATURES


The Dr. Seuss Enterprises, L.P.'s published non-disclosed posthumous forgeries all have counterfeit "Dr. Seuss" signatures applied.

Yet, for the tens of thousands of non-disclosed posthumous forgeries offered for sale, the Dr. Seuss Enterprises. L.P. would have the public believe and act on that belief when the so-called  "Certificates of Authenticity," given for them, states: “bears the authorized printed signature -Dr. Seuss-.”

 On page 1387 in the Seventh Edition of Black’s Law Dictionary, the term -signature- is defined as: “A person’s name or mark written by that person or at the person’s direction.”

Theodor Geisel died in 1991. The dead don't authorize, much less sign.


THE COVERUP BEGINS
In response to these devastating -facts-, The Chase Group began to alter their promotion and sale of these non-disclosed posthumous forgeries to further mask their full and honest disclosure. 

Here is one example:


In 2000, on The Chase Group's former www.chaseart.com website, they described the so-called Yertle The Turtle, for sale at $225 each, as a "Hand-Pulled Plate Lithograph" and "© 2000 The Chase Group."


In 2006, on The Chase Group's new www.drseussart.com website for this same so-called Yertle The Turtle, they have -removed- "Hand-Pulled Plate Lithograph" and "© 2000 The Chase Group" and -replaced- it with "Dr. Seuss Artworks" and "© 1960."

These non-disclosed posthumous forgeries, titled Yertle The Turtle, were -never- "Hand-pulled Plate Lithographs" in 2000, much less "Dr. Seuss Artworks" six years later in 2006.


Then in an attempt to further obscure these contentious issues of authenticity, The Chase Group posted online a www.drseussart.com/faq.html website, FAQ's a.k.a. Frequently Asked Questions that was an attempt to confuse, confound and coverup these allegations documented by this scholar in his prior published and posted "Art of Dr. Seuss Fraud" monograph.

So, would these contentious issues of authenticity, including but not limited to: the misrepresentation of non-disclosed posthumous forgeries as art, the posthumous application of a name promoted as a signature, the promotion of anything posthumously numbered as limited editions and the posthumous changes noted above, potentially constitute: "The act of fraudulently making a false document or altering a real one to be used as if genuine" which is one legal definition of -forgery-?

The following documents the subsequent attempts by The Chase Group to coverup these contentious issues of authenticity.










FIRST, on this website, under "FAQ's," it asks the question: "How do I purchase Dr. Seuss artworks?"

The Chase Group is -not- selling any "Dr. Seuss artworks."

The Chase Group confirms that devastating fact later on their www.drseussart.com/faq.html website when they ask the question: “Were any Dr. Seuss serigraphs, lithographs or sculpture published during his lifetime?” and the answer given is: “No.” 

Under U.S. Customs Informed Compliance May 2006, it states that "lithographs" and other original printmaking mediums "must be wholly executed by hand by the artist" and "excluding any mechanical and photomechanical processes."

Therefore, under U.S. Customs, if Theodor Geisel (d 1991) -never- created any lithographs, and serigraphs, much less [edition] sculptures, during his lifetime, it is -never- going to posthumously happen after his death in 1991.

Additionally, the State of Illinois’ Chapter 815 statute requires, if sold for $60 or more, the following:   "Describing the print as a "reproduction" eliminates the need to furnish further informational details unless such edition was allegedly published in a signed, numbered, or limited edition, or any combination thereof, in which case all of the informational details are required to be furnished."

Yet, despite the laws of nature and the rule of law, The [Illinois-based] Chase Group is promoting for sale tens of thousands of non-disclosed posthumous forgeries, with the title “Art of Dr. Seuss,” as original works of visual art ie., lithographs, serigraphs and [edition] sculpture.

The State of Illinois' Chapter 815 states: "Proof that no person has been misled or deceived or other wise damaged by any violation of this Act shall not constitute a defense in any prosecution under this Act."















SECOND, the question is asked: "How did The Art of Dr. Seuss project come to fruition?" The answer given is: "the work deserved further recognition."

How can any new “Art of Dr. Seuss come to fruition” when The Chase Group admits the so-called "Art of Dr. Seuss project was launched" in 1997, some six years after Theodor Geisel death in 1991?

The dead don't create art.


THIRD, under this same question, "How did The Art of Dr. Seuss project come to fruition?,” next paragraph, it states: "lithographs, serigraphs and sculpture reproduced from Geisel's original drawings and paintings."

Drawings and paintings, whether by Theodor Geisel or not, reproduced result, at best, in reproductions, not lithographs or serigraphs, much less sculptures.

Yet, despite U.S. Customs Informed Compliance May 2006 stating that "lithographs" and other original printmaking mediums "must be wholly executed by hand by the artist" and "excluding any mechanical and photomechanical processes," The Chase Group would have the public believe and act on that belief that "For the first time in history collectors were able to see and acquire lithographs, serigraphs and sculpture reproduced from Geisel’s original drawings and paintings."

Lithographs, serigraphs and sculptures as original works of visual art created by a [living] artist versus reproductions, which are copies of original works of visual art that are done by someone other than the artist [living or dead], are not interchangeable, much less the same.

In other words, The Chase Group is skewing reality in attempt to confuse the public so they will accept, much less believe, that the living presence of the artist is not necessary to create art.

Additionally, under the same question: "How did The Art of Dr. Seuss project come to fruition?," later in the third paragraph, it states: “This historic project has opened the world's eyes to the unique artistic talent of Dr. Seuss."

So, if Theodor Geisel's "artistic talent went far beyond the printed page," how did it go beyond his death in 1991, much less in 1997 when the so-called "Art of Dr. Seuss project" began?

The dead don't have "artistic talent."









FOURTH, the question is asked: "Were any Dr. Seuss serigraphs, lithographs or sculpture published during his lifetime?"

Serigraphs, lithographs and sculpture are original works of visual art created by hand by the [living] artist. These labor intensive original creative mediums, by [living] artists, would never be trivialized as "published," much less inferred they were created anytime other than during the lifetime of those artists.

Once again, this factual perspective is confirmed by U.S. Customs Informed Compliance May 2006 that state a "lithograph" or any other original printmaking medium "must be wholly executed by hand by the artist" and "excluding any photomechanical and mechanical processes."

Additionally, under U.S. Copyright Law, § 101. Definitions, a -derivative work- is defined as: "a work based upon one or more preexisting works, such as - art reproduction" and under U.S. Copyright law § 106A. the "Rights of certain authors to attribution and integrity - shall not apply to any reproduction."

Therefore, under U.S. Copyright Law and U.S. Customs, Theodor Geisel could not have created anything attributed to him after his death in 1991, much less in or after 1997.




F
IFTH
, under "1. "The Illustration Art Collection," it states: "The majority of these works have been reproduced using an historic technique called hand-pulled lithography. This intentionally “low-tech” method involves highly skilled artisans and master printers whose job it is to faithfully recreate Seuss’s original works - The result is a beautifully created artwork."

Lithographs, under U.S. Customs, are original works of visual art that "must be wholly executed by hand by the artist" and "excluding any mechanical and photomechanical processes."

In other words, lithographs are original works of visual art created by a [living] artist.

Yet, The Chase Group, in their convoluted scheme and avarice, would have the public believe reproductions versus lithographs are interchangeable, much less the same.

Then to go from the ridiculous to the sublime, those tens of thousands of non-disclosed posthumous forgeries, misrepresented as lithographs, are now being promoted by The Chase Group, as "recreated" by -skilled artisans- into "beautifully created artwork."

To make an analog, pyrite will -never- be gold, even if you leave out "fool" part of -fool's gold-.

So, would misrepresenting non-disclosed posthumous forgeries as an original works of visual art ie., lithographs be "the act of fraudulently making a false document or altering a real one to be used as if genuine" which is one legal definition of -forgery-?

NEW YORK LAW DOESN'T APPLY IN ILLINOIS
The [Illinois-based] Chase Group would have the public believe their tens of thousands of non-disclosed posthumous forgeries somehow adhere to "New York Print and Photograph Law" cited on the College Art Association website. In part, that law states:
  • 3. “Article twelve H of the New York general business law provides for disclosure in writing of certain information concerning multiples of prints and photographs when sold for more than one hundred dollars ($100) each, exclusive of any frame, prior to effecting a sale of them. This law requires disclosure of such matters as the identity of the artist, the artist’s signature, the medium, whether the multiple is a reproduction, the time when the multiple was produced, use of the master which produced the multiple, and the number of multiples in a limited edition.

The State of Illinois' Chapter 815 also requires reproductions sold for $60 or more to be disclosed as reproductions.

Yet, despite New York Law not being applicable to The [Illinois-based] Chase Group, The Chase Group does not even meet the requirements of that New York law by disclosing
"whether the multiple is a reproduction."

In The Chase Group's so-called Certificate of Authenticity, they refer to
their non-disclosed posthumous forgeries as "recreated."

Also, in the State of New York statute, under the subtitle:
"A. Prints or Photographs Published after September 1, 1981," the following information (as gleaned from the CAA website) must be supplied in writing:
1. The name of the artist.
2. Whether the multiple is signed by the artist’s own hand and, if not, the source of the artist’s name, as an estate stamp, etc.
3. The medium or process, such as lithograph, engraving, etc. and, in the case of photographs, the material used in producing the multiple. (a) Disclosure must be made if the artist was deceased when the master was made.1 (b) Disclosure must be made if the multiple is mechanical, photomechanical, or photographic copy of a work created in another medium where the work which is copied was not originally made for the purpose of making the multiple being sold,1 and (c) if the multiple referred to in 3 (b) is not signed, disclosure must be made if the artist did not authorize or approve the multiple in writing.

The Chase Group's so-called Certificates of Authenticity, for the tens of thousands of  non-disclsoed posthumous forgeries misleading promoted as the Art of Dr. Seuss, states: "Dr. Seuss- This signature has been authenticated by Audrey Geisel."
On page 1387 of the Seventh Edition of Black's Law Dictionary, -signature- is defined as: "a person's name or mark written by that person or at the person's direction."

The dead don't apply their signature.

Additionally, by The Chase Group misrepresenting non-disclosed posthumous forgeries as original works of visual art ie., lithographs and serigraphs, not to mention [edition] sculpture, which cannot be created posthumously (U.S. Customs Informed Compliance May 2006 confirms that), they seem to be violating New York statutes that state the following: "
Disclosure must be made if the multiple is mechanical, photomechanical, or photographic copy of a work created in another medium."

Since Theodor Geisel died in 1991 some six years before this so-called 1997 "Art of Dr. Seuss project" began, New York law states: "if the multiple referred to in 3 (b) is not signed, disclosure must be made if the artist did not authorize or approve the multiple in writing."

Yet, despite a dead Theodor Geisel could not have signed anything after his death in 1991, much less the tens of thousands of non-disclosed posthumous forgeries after 1997, The Chase Group would have the public believe that: "Seuss always dreamed of sharing these works with his fans and had entrusted his wife, Audrey, to carry out his wishes once he was gone. Audrey, too, believed the work deserved further recognition and that Ted himself would some day be evaluated not only as an author, but as an artist in his own right."


Non-disclosed posthumous forgeries are not art, nor the Art of Dr. Seuss, much less authorized and approved by the dead.










SIXTH, under "2. The Secret Art and Archive Collection," in The Chase Group's prior FAQ, it stated:  "Many of these works have been reproduced using hand-pulled serigraphy - this intentionally “low-tech” method is usually carried out under the direction of a master printmaker who must carefully breakdown an original painting into its many colors - print each color, one layer at a time."

That so-called master printmakers, hired by The Chase Group, are actually posthumously reproducing, in a new medium, with their hands and fingers the work of Theodor Geisel. Those non-disclosed posthumous forgeries are what The Chase Group and their authorized galleries misrepresents for sale as original works of visual art ie., serigraphs a.k.a. "Art of Dr. Seuss."

Now, it states: " Many of these works have been reproduced using hand-pulled serigraphy, also known as silkscreen printing. This method gained prominence in the mid 1960s when artists such as Andy Warhol took notice of silkscreen’s potential for fine art printmaking and began utilizing it to create multiple layer graphics full of bright colors and crisp detail.”

Serigraphs are -not- reproduced.

Serigraphs, like any original creative printmaking medium under U.S. Customs Informed Compliance May 2006, "must be wholly executed by hand by the artist [and] excluding any mechanical and photomechanical processes."

The Chase Group continues to use "serigraph" as an euphemism for -forgeries-, much less -reproductions-.

Once again, would that be “a knowing misrepresentation of the truth or concealment of a material fact to induce a person to his or her own detriment” which is one legal definition of -fraud-?













SEVENTH, under "2. The Secret Art and Archive Collection," second paragraph, it states: "some works in the collection employ more modern printmaking techniques not available to artists of past generations."

One of those so-called "modern printmaking techniques" is described as: "giclee offer a wide range of color saturation - Prints reproduced using this method capitalize on the brilliant fidelity of specially calibrated digital presses, coupled with inks and papers which were developed over many years and specifically designed for fine art printmaking."

"Fine art printmaking" does not apply to the dead, much less a dead Theodor Geisel.

Additionally, giclee as a reproduction process results in reproductions, not "fine art printmaking."

That is not to mention the giclee reproduction technology, when using the brightly colored dyes, is as lightfast as a "cereal box.” These contentious issues of lightfastness of giclee reproduction technology were documented and published in the October 1996 ART CALENDAR issue.

There potentially goes their so-called "brilliant fidelity" of the non-disclosed giclee forgeries, much less reproductions The Chase Group promotes for sale through their authorized galleries..


EIGHTH, and furthermore, it states: "Just as silkscreen printmaking revolutionized the way artist and printmakers expressed themselves in the 1960s, so too has giclee printmaking in the early 21st century."

Theodor Geisel (d 1991) died in the 20th-century and yet according to The Chase Group, it would have the public believe that a dead artist, such as Theodor Geisel a.k.a. Dr. Seuss, is still expressing himself in the early 21st-century.


















NINTH, under "3. The Collection of Unorthodox Taxidermy (Seuss Sculptures)," it states: "Today, Seuss’s sculptures are reproduced as hand-painted cast resin sculptures and are painstakingly prepared to accurately recreate the aesthetic brilliance of the originals."

Sculptures are original works of visual art created by a living artist. Sculptures posthumously reproduced result in reproductions -not- "hand-painted cast resin sculptures."















Rhetorically, would misrepresenting, what at best are, posthumous reproductions as an original works of visual art ie., sculptures be "the act of fraudulently making a false document or altering a real one to be used as if genuine" which is one legal definition of -forgery-?










TENTH, the question is asked: "Are these works signed by Dr. Seuss?"

The answer given was: "because the reproductions included in The Art of Dr. Seuss project were created after his lifetime, each limited edition lithograph and serigraph bears an Authorized Printed Signature and each sculpture an Authorized Engraved Signature."

"After his lifetime" means Theodor Geisel was -dead-.

On page 1387 of the Seventh Edition of Black's Law Dictionary, -signature- is defined as: "a person's name or mark written by that person or at the person's direction."

The dead don't apply their signature.

On page 354 of the Seventh Edition of Black's Law Dictionary, -counterfeit- is defined as: "to forge, copy, or imitate (something) without a right to do so and with the purpose of deceiving or defrauding."

Therefore, rhetorically, would the posthumous application of a -counterfeit- "Dr. Seuss" signature to posthumous reproductions misrepresented as original works of visual art be "the act of fraudulently making a false document or altering a real one to be used as if genuine" which is one legal definition of -forgery-?











ELEVENTH, the question is asked: "Are all works in the collection created in limited editions?" The answer given was: "Yes, these works are in extremely small editions."

Under U.S. Copyright Law: § 101. Definitions, "A -work of visual art- is — (1) a painting, drawing, print or sculpture, existing in a single copy, in a limited edition of 200 copies or fewer that are signed and consecutively numbered by the author, or, in the case of a sculpture, in multiple cast, carved, or fabricated sculptures of 200 or fewer that are consecutively numbered by the author and bear the signature or other identifying mark of the author."

Therefore, how can the so-called -Art of Dr. Seuss-, that consists of tens of thousands of non-disclosed posthumous forgeries that are -not- "works of visual art" and obviously could not have been "signed and consecutively numbered" by a dead Theodor Giesel, ever be considered "limited editions?"

The dead don't sign and consecutively number.




TWELFTH, the question is asked: "Is there a certificate of authenticity issues for these works?"

The answer given is: "Yes."

On page 127 of the Seventh Edition of Black's Law Dictionary, -authentication- is defined as: "Broadly, the act of proving that something (as a document) is true or genuine. esp. so that it may be admitted as evidence."

There is nothing authentic about The Chase Group's misrepresentation of non-disclosed posthumous forgeries, much less reproductions, as the -Art of Dr. Seuss- and their pieces of paper with the title -Certificate of Authenticity- won't change that.

The Chase Group are one of the too many to mention alchemists of the 21st-century who come into the art industry with one goal: "why let the truth interfere with commerce."

For additional documentation, link to: Art of Dr. Seuss FRAUD

22 Comments:

Blogger Marc Hebert said...

I really appreciate this blog post. On vacation this past weekend, I had thoughts about spending $2000 on what I thought was Seuss original. Certainly one could say I was naive to expect an original at that price, but my experience was that the gallery would have been happy to make the sale knowing I thought I was buying something I wasn't. I think what I find most troubling is the "official" Dr. Seuss signature, which is a recreation. I'd like to believe without your blog I would have read the fine print and asked questions and came to the same purchase decision, but your post accelerated the process. I don't expect to ever make a future purchase from a gallery that has sold "The Art of Dr. Seuss".

4:50 PM, July 12, 2007  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

So what can be done. Is it possible to file a suit against such a large corporation?

Or, perhaps, a suit against a gallery or gallery chain would be more feasible?????

3:45 PM, October 03, 2007  
Blogger Mary Lee Pappas said...

THANK YOU, Gary, for bringing this to light. I have published your comment regarding my reivew of the show on my blog.

And, I published your "coverup" piece after the review as well.

If you get a chance, read my review on the blog of a Marilyn Monroe exhibit...it was just plain old unsettling.

10:31 PM, October 09, 2007  
Anonymous Podblack Cat said...

What brilliant work! After having written a blog post on a touring exhibition that has reached Australia (with absolutely no indication that what we were seeing were fakes - thank hades I didn't buy anything), I wrote a well-received blog post on taxonomy, skepticism and the frauds that have occurred in natural history. I included a light-hearted look at the taxonomy (frauds!) of the Seuss exhibition and compared them to the fakes perpetrated for educational reasons in modern times.

To discover the two posts on what has been done with his art (thank you so much for commenting) has just made my blog entry even better. I think that this has the potential to be brought to a wider audience, particularly natural historians, as not only an example of art fraud but a scam equal to the Barnam Feejee mermaids.

As I wrote on my blog - skepticism about these elements are valuable and only bring us to emphasize critical thinking no matter what the academic field is approached. Thank you very, very much!

10:33 AM, March 09, 2008  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

How come you do not sue them for selling fakes? Or expose the galleries for the frauds they are? Posting a blog is great to get your point across, but it is meaningless in the scope of reality. Have you attempted to purseu legal action? If not, how come?

4:45 PM, April 21, 2008  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

well.....I am convinced you are correct. I doubt these serigraphs were even pulled by anything other than CNC machines. Kudos to you for kicking these so-called pretentious fine-art galleries in their moneygrubbing a$$, sir!

12:58 AM, June 26, 2008  
Anonymous Tim in San Diego said...

So you spend all this time going on and on about this fraud for what reason? Perhaps to hear yourself talk? I was interested at first but you repeat yourself so much and go on and on over and over attempting to make your point. You offered your opinion, your statement of what you believe to be fact but why? Who are you telling? You just get the public upset and angry but offer little direction or better yet example of what has been done and by who. This blog lacks credibility which is sad. It could be of great value to us all but instead it makes me and several of my friends wonder if you might just have a personal issue with the Chase group. Even if you don't, it's an obvious assumption and you would do well to assure us that this is not the case. You left me feeling taken and cheated (I was given two of these as gifts) I felt special to have one of these lithographs but what now? Should we throw them away? Prove what you say with an action that has been taken and completed against Chase. An example of a way to get back our money that has worked with this situation. Disappointed in San Diego

7:41 AM, December 07, 2009  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Tim, don't shoot the messenger,

I also own several of these pieces that I paid for, the difference being I was lucky enough to have read this prior to buying so I was able to make an informed decision based on the facts. So thanks for posting this.

Originally I chose not to buy them because of this article, until 5 years later when I saw the exhibition again and thought what the hell, we still love them, they make me laugh (and I paid more), everyone comments on them and they compliment our other art.

The blog is coming from a technical aspect in that the artist should create and do the process, however unless you pay someone else to paint it for you and possibly break copy right law, this is still the only way to own these.

Had I bought under the pretence of what the original gallery was trying to sell me (and I told the gallery they were ill informed) I would have had extreme issue and would have taken it up with them.

I suggest to any one who deals with a gallery who is not honest and upfront about this, find a different gallery and foster a relationship with them.

The bottom line is if you like them, don’t worry about it and just enjoy them.

12:57 AM, February 22, 2010  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Thank you so much for bringing this to light. This is very helpful to those of us that are novice collectors.

12:52 PM, September 29, 2010  
Anonymous Chris said...

I've checked out your site and your writing about other artists, and it left me wondering what motivates you to spend such exorbitant amounts of time "proving" facts which are already common knowledge. Perhaps you were burned by a dishonest gallery or, more likely, it's simply professional jealousy of deceased artists who receive more attention than you -- regardless, your angry and pseudo-academic diatribes are the ramblings of a tin-foil hat-wearing conspiracy theorist.

I live in San Diego, so through the course of attending local art shows I have met Audrey Geisel and seen several of Seuss' originals. I have also seen the reproductions in perhaps a dozen or so galleries. Never in any of these circumstances has any fact about their origin or any detail about their reproduction been misrepresented to me. Every single gallery rep has said the same thing: Everything was done posthumously, even the signature. In fact, what they have said is so similar that I suspect it came from a Chase Group playbook.

There are, of course, a few shady dealers in the world who will bend the truth (or outright lie) to sell a piece. I am sure that some have misrepresented this work, just as they have done for every other artist in existence. This is nothing new and your work does nothing to further illuminate or eradicate that fact. Perhaps you would do better to gain attention by focusing on your own art rather than battling imaginary demons.

11:43 AM, September 30, 2010  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I cant imagne anyone would really buy one thinking dr seuss pulled the screens himself!

The website makes it prety clear that you are buying high quality limited edition reproductions, having seen the exhibition and bought a couple of pieces i never felt i was buying anything more than that.

7:36 PM, April 23, 2011  
Blogger Gary Arseneau said...

April 24, 2011

Serigraphs and lithographs are original works of visual art created by an artist.

Since Theodor Geisel was dead when these were forged, it is a rank obscenity to attribute them to the dead as their original works of visual art.

If The Chase Group were actually selling "high-end reproductions," why are they selling them as the "Art of Dr. Seuss?"

Additionally, if The Chase Group were actually selling "high-end reproductions," why are they misrepresenting them as original works of visual art ie., serigraphs, lithographs and sculptures?

Furthermore, if The Chase Group were actually selling "high-end reproductions," why are they counterfeiting "Dr. Seuss" signatures with bogus edition numbers to them?

A signature, by any legal definition, is autographed by the person's own hand and under U.S. Copyright Law, an original work of visual art can be considered limited if "signed and numbered by the author."

The dead don't sign, much less number.

The Chase Group, despite being notified about these contentious issues of authenticity, continues to misrepresent forgeries as original works of visual art, falsely attributed them to a dead Dr. Seuss a.k.a. Theodor Geisel and unfairly compete with legitimate artists who actually create lithographs, serigraphs and sculpture, not to mention those who sell fully disclosed reproductions.

In other words, without full and honest disclosure, how can the consumer give informed consent on whether to purchase one of The Chase Group's tens of thousands of non-disclosed forgeries, not to mention how can legitimate living artists compete if the dead can still come out with new work in labor intensive creative mediums they never worked in while alive?

Finally, the representation by The Chase Group: "Art of Dr. Seuss," does not match their convoluted "FAQ" disclosure on their website which is nothing more than there to confuse, muddle and distort reality for their avarice.

In closing, The Chase Group's so-called "art of Dr. Seuss" is "a knowing misrepresentation of the truth or concealment of a material fact to induce another to his or her detriment" which is one legal definition of -fraud-.

Caveat Emptor!

Gary Arseneau
artist, creator of original lithographs & scholor
Fernandina Beach, Florida

11:47 AM, April 24, 2011  
Blogger Chris Allsopp said...

I was pretty surprised by your comments about how Dr Seuss' illustrations were being replicated by another artist.. You say that the the 1997 illustration of Oh The Place's You'll Go is different from the 1990 poster version because the balloon is further away from the mountain and the smaller balloon is missing... but I just opened up my book and the 1997 version is actually the version in print. The poster version is actually the incorrect one - presumably it was altered so they could put the border in. Your comparison is therefore misleading and, I think, incorrect.

1:16 PM, June 16, 2012  
Blogger Gary Arseneau said...

June 16, 2012

Dear Chris:

I thank you for your comment.

The so-called "Art of Dr. Seuss," offered for sale by The Chase Group and participating galleries, are non-disclosed posthumous chromist-made forgeries.

Replicates, by definition, are original works of visual art created by the artist.

As for The Chase Group's non-disclosed chromist-made forgeries, titled "Oh The Place's You'll Go," offered for sale to the public, it may initially look similar to the reproduction in Theodor Geisel's published 1990 book but they are non-disclosed chromist-made forgeries posthumously filtered by the hands and fingers of someone not named Theodor Geisel.

Therefore, I have updated and will continue to update my blog to further reflect those facts.

Caveat Emptor!

Gary Arseneau
artist & creator of original lithographs
Fernandina Beach, Florida

9:45 PM, June 16, 2012  
Anonymous Tania from Australia said...

My husband and I have just returned from San Francisco where we purchased two Dr Suess Seregraphs' from one of the art galleries. We are not art experts, but both liked the fun aspect of these works. We were further assured by the gallery of their authenticity and that we wouldn't find them being sold through the internet. I this afternoon logged on to E Bay and immediately found one of our purchases being offered at a starting price far lowe than what we paid and with only 4 days remaining (one bidder to date). After reading your blog and comments, I'm further distressed that we have paid a lot of money for some fairly worthless art, but also agree with a couple of bloggers and wonder why the galleries are able to continue to promote and sell these pieces as lithographs that will only supposedly increase in value. I was also advised that they all had a set price and could not be sold below this minimum. I now doubt this is true. I look forward to your comments

5:23 AM, June 17, 2012  
Blogger Gary Arseneau said...

June 16, 2012

Dear Tania:

I thank you for your inquiry

Theodor Geisel a.k.a. Dr. Seuss -never- created any serigraphs in his life, numbered them in a limited edition or signed them.

You and your husband were played.

Now, what are your options?

FIRST OPTION: Contact your Visa/Mastercard provider, if you paid by credit card, inform them how the gallery misled you and ask them to cancel payment and then arrange for the return of the non-disclosed posthumous forgeries.

[If paid by check, contact your bank and find out your options. Maybe it hasn't cleared.]

SECOND OPTION, If shipped by mail to your home, refuse acceptance [if possible] and immediately contact your credit card company or bank [see above].

THIRD OPTION, if you paid cash, contact the [D.R.?]gallery [on Geary Street in San Francisco?] and ask for a refund because of the promises made of authenticity and that they would not be found sold on the internet. Neither of which, as you have discovered, are true.

Remember the squeaky wheel gets the oil.

Finally, there are additional options but they rhetorically involve throwing more money down a rabbit hole.

In closing, I hope one of these options will assist you in a successful conclusion.

Caveat Emptor!

Gary Arseneau
artist & creator of original lithographs
Fernandina Beach, Florida

8:20 AM, June 17, 2012  
Anonymous Tania said...

Thanks Gary, yes I feel quite let down and may follow your advice re credit card options. Thanks fo your help - will peruse your website further down the track.

6:41 PM, June 17, 2012  
Anonymous Anonymous said...


Thank you for your blog post.

I am still a little unclear on the validity in terms of the Chase Gallery's relationship to the Widow Audrey Geisel.

I understand your technical specifications that illustrate the fact they shouldn't be called anything other than 'reproductions' but are they authorized by his estate or not?

Like another post I too noticed the dates they were created and issued and purchased a couple of pieces with eyes wide open knowing they were simply pretty and poignant decorations for my daughters' rooms. However, it'd be nice to know that they are of a superior quality than if simply printed a photo or picture from the internet and printed / framed / on my own.

Thanks for sharing your views.

12:02 PM, February 12, 2014  
Blogger Gary Arseneau said...

February 12, 2014

Anonymous
Lynnwood, Washington

Dear Anonymous:

I thank you for your inquiry.

On The Chase Group's website, it states: "In 1993, Ted’s widow Audrey founded Dr. Seuss Enterprises (DSE) to to protect and monitor the use of Dr. Seuss’s characters for licensing purposes." The link is: http://www.drseussart.com/ biography.html

In 1993, Theodor Geisel [d 1991] was some two years dead. The dead don't posthumously create art, much less the "Art of Dr. Seuss."

One of the thousands of -COA[s]-, for The Chase Group's "Yertle the Turtle," states: “bears the authorized printed signature - Dr. Seuss -. This signature has been authenticated by Audrey Geisel.”

Audrey Geisel authenticated a posthumous counterfeit "Dr. Seuss" signature. The dead don't apply their signature.

The United States Federal Trade Commission Policy Statement of Unfairness states: “A seller’s failure to present complex and technical data on his product may lessen a consumer’s ability to choose, for example, but may also reduce the initial price he must pay for the article.---Finally, the injury must be one which consumers could not reasonably have avoided.”

Without full and honest disclosure, how can the consumer, give informed consent, much less reasonably avoid anything?

In closing, Audrey Geisel and her business associate The Chase Group have created a false market to sell tens of thousands of non-disclosed posthumous forgeries with counterfeit "Dr. Seuss" signatures by misrepresenting them as legitimate works of visual ie., lithographs, serigraphs and sculpture. These original creative mediums require a living artist and can be are very labor intensive by those living artists. The dead don't labor, much less posthumously create anything.

Audrey Geisel, her business associates and participating galleries have -no- shame.

To learn more, click on this link: http://garyarseneau.blogspot.com/2006/09/art-of-dr-seuss-fraud.html

In closing, I hope the enclosed will empower you to understand the choices you have.

All the best,

Gary Arseneau
artist, creator of original lithographs

2:31 PM, February 12, 2014  
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12:56 PM, April 15, 2014  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I recently purchased a "Grinch" print from a local gallery for the price of the frame and mat. The dealer pointed out that it was;
A. printed after Dr. Seuss' death B. Not actually signed by the dead guy
C. A very nice quality picture with an embossed seal and edition number
.
No attempt was made to lie or misrepresent it an anything it was not.
.
You can buy a Rembrandt etching made a hundred years after he died.
.
Perhaps it is the lack of sales of you "art" that causes the Dr. Seuss hate? Maybe it is the shameful knock-off of Leroy Neiman's style?
.
The tourist trap themed pictures probably sell ok during the winter months,,,,,,,,,,,,,spending the summer painting houses or fences might be a good option.
.
I'm just wondering,why all the hate for Dr. Suess pictures? did the "Cat in the Hat" treat you badly as a child?

11:04 AM, April 24, 2014  
Blogger Gary Arseneau said...

April 24, 2014

Anonymous
Holland, Michigan [?]

Dear Anonymous:

Aside the ad hominen attacks on my character and observations about my work, anyone who believes that "Rembrandt etchings" can be made posthumously has some serious connoisseurship issues.

The dead don't etch.

So, if I may, I would like to share some information of interest on the "Art of Dr. Seuss" -fraud- that may assist you in your connoisseurship.

Theodor Geisel a.k.a. Dr. Seuss -never-, in his lifetime, created, approved or signed and numbered an edition of lithographs, serigraphs or sculptures which are original works of visual art that only can be created by living artists. These facts are supported by the following references:

On their www.drseussart.com/faq.html website, The Chase Group [exclusive publisher for Dr. Seuss Artworks] asks the question: “Were any Dr. Seuss serigraphs, lithographs or sculpture published during his lifetime?” and the answer given is: “No.”

U.S. Customs May 2006 An Informed Compliance Publication titled Works of Art, Collector`s Pieces Antiques, and Other Cultural Property states: "The expression original engravings, prints and lithographs means impressions produced directly, in black and white or in color, of one or of several plates wholly executed by hand by the artist, irrespective of the process or of the material employed by him, but excluding any mechanical or photomechanical process." http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/trade/legal/informed_compliance_pubs/

The dead don't create art.

On their www.drseussart.com/faq.html website, The Chase Group [exclusive publisher for Dr. Seuss Artworks] states: "The Art of Dr. Seuss project were created after his lifetime, each limited edition lithograph and serigraph bears an Authorized Printed Signature and each sculpture an Authorized Engraved Signature."

On page 1387 of the Seventh Edition of Black's Law Dictionary, -signature- is defined as: "a person's name or mark written by that person or at the person's direction."

The dead don't sign.

On their www.drseussart.com/faq.html website, The Chase Group [exclusive publisher for Dr. Seuss Artworks] states: "Are all works in the collection created in limited editions?" The answer given was: "Yes, these works are in extremely small editions."

Under U.S. Copyright Law: § 101. Definitions, "A -work of visual art- is — (1) a painting, drawing, print or sculpture, existing in a single copy, in a limited edition of 200 copies or fewer that are signed and consecutively numbered by the author, or, in the case of a sculpture, in multiple cast, carved, or fabricated sculptures of 200 or fewer that are consecutively numbered by the author and bear the signature or other identifying mark of the author."

The dead don't number.


Unfortunately, the so-called Art of Dr. Seuss and Secret Art Collection is -not- art, much less reproductions, but -once again- non-disclosed posthumous [after 1997] chromist-made [posthumously copied by the hand and fingers of someone other than Theodor Geisel (d 1991)] forgeries, falsely attributed to Theodor Geisel as original works of visual art ie., lithographs, serigraphs and sculptures, in bogus limited editions with counterfeit "Dr. Seuss" signatures.

In closing, I hope the enclosed will assist you to understand your choices in the future, so you may give informed consent.

All the best,

Gary Arseneau
artist, creator of original lithographs
Fernandina Beach, Florida

1:53 PM, April 24, 2014  

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